We have covered PAYE and IBR and now we turn to Revised Pay As Your Earn or RePAYE 

1. Percentage of discretionary income owed over the course of the year: 10% of your discretionary income.  (If you don’t remember how to calculate discretionary income, check out the original post on IDR plans).  There is no cap on RePAYE, so even if 10% of your discretionary income is over the 10-year standard repayment plan, you will not be kicked out of the program.

2. Eligible loans

Any Direct Loan made to an eligible borrower is eligible for the RePAYE Program except for: (1) a defaulted loan, (2) a Direct PLUS Loan or Federal PLUS Loan made to a parent borrower, (3) or a Direct Consolidation Loan or Federal Consolidation Loan that repaid a Direct PLUS Loan or Federal PLUS Loan made to a parent borrower.

Perkins loans or FFEL loans are eligible if consolidated into a Direct Loan.  However, take care not to consolidate a Parent loan along with them.  Consolidating a Parent loan taints the entire consolidation and makes it ineligible.

3. Eligible borrowers

 

Any borrower with eligible federal student loans can make payments under this plan.

4. Forgiveness opportunities

Much like under PAYE and IBR, there is an opportunity to have your balance forgiven, regardless of your employment.  This differs by the purpose of the loans.  If you took out loans for undergraduate study only, the balance will be forgiven in 20 years.  If you took out loans for graduate or professional school, the balance will be forgiven in 25 years.

If you are eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (for which RePAYE is a qualified plan), your loans could be forgiven after 120 payments or 10 years.

5. How the plan handles spousal income

Regardless of whether you file separately or jointly, RePAYE considers you and your spouse’s income jointly.   This makes RePAYE distinct from IBR and PAYE where filing separately allows your servicer to look at you and your spouse’s income separately.

6. Interest benefits

RePAYE has a more substantial interest subsidy if you end up with a low enough payment that you do not pay off the interest that accrues ever month.  For subsidized loans, the government will pay the full amount of unpaid accruing interest for the first 3 years and 50% of the difference after that.  For unsubsidized loans, the government will pay 50% of the difference throughout the process.  By comparison, the IBR and PAYE programs do not have an interest benefit for unsubsidized loans.

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